Easily Search your Recipe Notes

Private recipe notes are one of the many useful features of BigOven Pro. They’re like recipe reviews, but they remain private, and they’re not shown to anyone but you. You can add notes on recipes via the recipe detail page, via the BigOven mobile apps, or on the “Notes” tab on any recipe page on bigoven.com.

Search Notes Easily

You can now easily search those notes on www.bigoven.com, as well as browse a handy list of all the ones you’ve entered. To find the notes view, simply click on “My Recipes“, and then the notes icon in the upper navigation control. To search your notes, just type in the phrase in the search box to the right and press enter.

Easily search your recipe notes

You can also easily edit or delete any recipe notes you’ve added on the recipe detail page:

Uses

  • Love to entertain? Keep track of dishes you make, to avoid serving the same thing over and over again.
  • Enter the name(s) of the people you cooked a recipe for, or ones you might want to serve it — you can then just search on their name. It’s a handy cooking diary.
  • Enter your favorite wine pairings. When you’re serving particular wines, you can easily find recipes that pair well.
  • Enter adjustments to a recipe that make it just right for your family, or substitutions you think are best. Keep track of presentation tips and more. Notes are displayed only to you, and only when you’re signed in.

BigOven Pro is the ultimate tool for home cooks, and free to try for 30 days, and removes all ads wherever you sign in. Learn more.

BigOven Pro Lifetime Membership Now Available

One common request we get from BigOven Pro members is for lifetime BigOven Pro Membership.

People love BigOven Pro — it removes all advertising and unlocks great features like custom folders and a Menu Planner. But some customers have told us they’d prefer just a simple one-time payment, and not a recurring charge. So today, we’re introducing BigOven Pro Lifetime membership. For a one-time payment of $79, you can upgrade your account to BigOven Pro for life. You can use any credit card and even your Amazon account to pay. If you’re currently a BigOven Pro subscriber, all your data carries over, and your recurring charge (monthly or annual) will be cancelled. You can then enjoy all the BigOven Pro features wherever you sign in.

Remember, one BigOven Pro membership is all that’s required — BigOven Pro features carry across mobile and web points of service. Upgrade your membership today.

To learn more about BigOven Pro, compare BigOven Pro Member Levels.

Notes

Purchasing will upgrade your account to BigOven Pro membership for life. No further subscription charges for BigOven Pro will be required. Should you already have a BigOven Pro subscription purchased on mobile (e.g., via Google Play or the Apple App Store), you will need to cancel those subscriptions, because only you can do so; we cannot do so from our side. Fortunately it’s quite easy; specific instructions for your platform are emailed to you upon your Lifetime Pro Upgrade. Still have questions? Contact us.

 

Easily Revisit Recipes that You’ve Recently Viewed

By popular request, we’ve added a handy “Recently Viewed” option in your “My Recipes” area and in Search on the BigOven apps to list all the recipes you’ve recently viewed.

On the web, just click on “My Recipes” in the upper toolbar, and then “Recently Viewed” on the left hand view control. In the Android or iOS app, just tap the magnifying glass, and you’ll see an option for “Recently Viewed”. Your BigOven account keeps track of recipes you’ve viewed on any device.

To see the last recipes you’ve viewed in the app or the website, just click on Recently Viewed.

This feature requires a BigOven membership; it will not display recipes you view when you’re not signed in.

Amazon is Buying Whole Foods Market: Great for Grocery Innovation

North American home cooks can expect even more convenient options and innovations to arrive over the next few years with Amazon’s announcement that they are acquiring Whole Foods. Moreover, the secondary competitive effects have a shot at finally ushering this once slow-moving but vital retail sector into a much more convenient and frictionless digital age.

The aggressive move, by far Amazon’s biggest acquisition to date, greatly expands Amazon’s currently minuscule brick-and-mortar retail footprint, and allows Amazon to much more rapidly scale services like grocery pick-up, home delivery and online ordering features.

Here in Seattle, we have a front-row seat to the innovations and experiments that Amazon has performed regarding grocery: delivery with Amazon Fresh, Dash Buttons, Amazon Go (“cashierless” stores), Amazon Fresh Pickup and more.

Whole Foods has 465 stores in North America and the United Kingdom, and according to Amazon it will continue to operate as a separate entity. Amazon has been a leader with grocery innovation, but so far it’s experiments have been small-scale. They’ve amassed considerable data on what works (and doesn’t) about grocery delivery, handheld voice tools, ambient voice devices like the Echo, cashierless shopping and consolidated grocery pickup.

We here at BigOven are always happy to see innovation in this once-sleepy but absolutely vital grocery industry, and today’s news is causing a lot of heads to turn among our partners in the industry.

Wall Street’s Early Read

Wall Street loves the deal — both Amazon and Whole Foods are up significantly:

And it knocked nearly $40 billion of market cap off of major grocery retailers and consumer packaged goods companies:

Our Take

We love to see innovation in the space and applaud Amazon for taking an aggressive, long-term step here to deliver more innovation to grocery. The US market for food and beverage is $795 billion, it’s the single highest-occasion shopping we do as consumers. Food and beverages accounts for 30% of all U.S. personal spending excluding cars and energy, according to Morgan Stanley.

On a data level, this gives Amazon a much clearer picture of consumers, and not just in the grocery category.

We are, after all, what we eat. Consumers express enormous implicit information when they buy at a grocery store. If you know consumer A is buying Kraft Macaroni and Cheese, chips and a case of Coors Light on a Friday afternoon in a transaction size of $38, and another is purchasing watercress, arugula and salmon in a $230 transaction on a Tuesday, you already know a lot about these two consumers. And that fuller picture will be used to better inform all recommendations.

We love to see innovation in grocery to make life easier for the home cook, it’s precisely what we’re about. For quite some time now, we’ve been wanting a world where home cooks could plan what they want to make, intelligently use up more of what they buy at the store, and instantly get items delivered to them (or pick them up) to make the perfect meal. This commitment by Amazon is terrific to see, as it alone should bring some great innovation. Its secondary effects might generate even more impact however — it is already causing some much-needed discussion in retailer and packaged good company boardrooms.

It’s high time things get even easier for home cooks. We are increasingly pressed for time, yet we still want to put a great meal on the table for our families. This massive transaction will no doubt push great chains like Kroger and Safeway further in completing their solutions for home cooks.

Amazon acquires:

  • Loads of data on high-end consumer buying preferences
  • Retail footprint
  • Distribution infrastructure for grocery delivery – employees, warehousing, food and produce sourcing, refrigeration, merchandising
  • Live retail labs for buying/merchandising
  • Logical delivery points for Echo, web and shopping list canvases

At BigOven, we’re all about using digital technology to improve the lifecycle of the home cook. This cycle, which hits daily has a large amount of cognitive load and physical hassle. Many of us love to cook, but find the process of figuring out what to make, planning, shopping challenging. We think the Amazon-Whole Foods transaction helps close that loop for Amazon, though it might not be fully aligned for all demographics (Whole Foods serves customers at the high end of the market).

After dabbling in various experiments in the grocery space, Amazon’s commitment signals a new digital era in grocery. In our view, given the size of grocery and its high occasion, it makes sense for Amazon to make grocery a strategic priority, as it fits with Amazon’s goal of being earth’s most customer-centric company. Amazon will continue to get great data on what consumers are buying to be able to deliver even more customized options.

The race is now on to own America’s shopping list, and if Amazon really wants to own it, they probably need a way to stock and deliver grocery items at scale. Players need a combination of assets such as:

  • Customer scale
  • Distribution infrastructure
  • Pick-up infrastructure
  • Digital platforms to look up recipes, manage a recipe collection, create plans and a grocery list
  • Planning tools with curated menu ideas
  • Household list management from any screen or canvas
  • Personalization and preference technologies

Amazon is known for market disruption, and we both welcome big bets like this in this category, and we expect to see counter-moves by big retailers like Albertsons Safeway, Kroger,  Trader Joe’s, Ahold Delhaize (Food Lion, Stop & Shop etc.) and others.

Across many categories of Amazon’s business, Walmart has been a chief rival, and this certainly ups the ante in the Amazon vs. Walmart competition. Amazon has certainly shown other retailers that unless they innovate, they’re in danger of being obsolete, as more and more purchase decisions will take place via ambient voice interaction, mobile and web, use machine learning for personalization and targeted deals, and much more.

But it won’t happen overnight, and Amazon initially gains primarily high-end grocery shopper coverage with this move. In addition to the logistical challenges of integrating a workforce with 67,000 employees, another major in our minds is whether the Whole Foods customer is (by and large) the same as the core Amazon customer, and also whether the core values of each institution match closely.

It also remains an open question whether the relatively high-end nature of the the Whole Foods customer fully aligns with Amazon’s core customer base. Another way to put this: you can’t buy Diet Coke or Kraft Mac ‘n Cheese at Whole Foods, and it’s for a deliberate reason — it’s in the name of the company itself. To achieve what we believe to be Amazon’s grander ambitions in the space to serve more than just the organics high-end purchaser, we predict that Whole Foods infrastructure will ultimately be used to expand downmarket — out horizontally from their current core base, likely via rebranding (e.g., Whole Foods becomes Amazon Fresh Organic, with Amazon Fresh offering the widest variety.) Not all home cooks are Whole Foods customers, though most of us here at BigOven are.

This presents a particularly interesting situation for Instacart. Whole Foods is an investor in Instacart, and one of Instacart’s top sources for delivery is Whole Foods. Instacart can continue to be a “Switzerland” for home delivery, neutral between parties, but more and more they will be in competition with an integrated Amazon-Whole Foods.

On the grocery delivery and/or pickup front, it’s still too fragmented. Most consumers shop at more than one grocery store in a given month. We think there’s an opportunity to establish a digital standard for grocery list communication between apps like ours (i.e., apps which home cooks use to make grocery lists) and grocers that have the end-products to purchase, in much the same way the retail photo finishing industry accepts orders from multiple photo apps.  It has to provide a financial incentive for apps to connect, but it’s completely feasible today; it just needs the will to make it happen. This would make grocery purchase and delivery considerably easier and increase velocity of home delivery and out-of-store selection for pickup.

For our part, BigOven currently has 3.8 million members, many of whom make grocery lists and would love home delivery; it’s a frequent feature request. If you’re in the grocery retail industry or delivery business and you’d like to discuss that with us, reach out.

About BigOven

BigOven is a leading app for the home cook. From great recipe ideas to organization, from planning what to make to grocery shopping, preparation and social sharing, BigOven makes cooking simpler. BigOven has 3.8 million members, 13+ million downloads, 1.6 million recipes and 4,000+ food bloggers with the Save Recipe plugin. Every day we welcome thousands of new members, and we hope you’re one of them. Join us today.

“Missing” Recipes? Make sure you’re signing in with the right account.

BigOven keeps your recipes organized across the web and mobile devices, and lets you sign in and join via Facebook, Google+ or email. Sometimes, when moving to a new device or upgrading their app and signing in, cooks notice a near-empty My Recipes area and write in to say “Help, where are all my recipes?”

The first thing to note is that all your recipes are still there, safe and sound — it’s just that you very likely have inadvertently created more than one membership (by, say, accidentally clicking “Join” instead of “Sign In”), and you’re likely not signed into the “master” account. Very often, this arises because you may have added recipes using one (say, email-based) BigOven membership and then sign into, or inadvertently create, a totally different membership (say, via Facebook, if you’ve used a different email address for that registration.)

Not to worry. Your recipes are still there — you simply need to sign in with the correct account.

Key concept: BigOven places high value on your email address to identify who you are.

How Facebook and Google+ Sign-in Work

When you sign into BigOven with Facebook or with Google+, after you give permission to BigOven and have authenticated with them, at sign-in BigOven is handed the registered email address you have with Facebook or Google+, and next looks for a BigOven membership with that email address.

But a problem can arise if you’ve used a different email address to register with Facebook or Google+ than the one you may have created on BigOven. Thus when you sign in, you may see radically different or fewer recipes in that secondary account.

There’s an easy fix

You simply need to use the same email address on BigOven as you do with the service(s) you sign in with.

  1. From a desktop computer (or a mobile device), you can use the BigOven.com website to locate and verify your “master” account — i.e., the primary one that matters most to you.
    1. Sign into BigOven.com. Check your My Recipes area to verify that this is indeed where your recipes are. (If not, try another login.)
    2. Click on the Account tab to check your account details. This will tell you what email address is registered for the account.
    3. If you don’t remember your password for this email account, you can set or reset one by visiting https://www.bigoven.com/account/forgot. BigOven will email you a reset-your-password link, and you can choose a new password.
  2. Now, sign out of the app in question. (On the new iOS apps, you can see the Sign Out option by clicking the Bell icon and then the gear icon in the upper right.)
  3. Sign into the app using the email/password combination that you’ve verified is the correct one from the web.
  4. If you have more than a couple dozen recipes, give it several minutes to pull down your recipes, grocery list and folders.

Your accounts are now linked and synchronized.

Alternatively, you can change the registered email address of your BigOven.com account to the one that you know is registered for Facebook and Google+. To change your registered email address on BigOven, visit your “Account Settings” area and then the Account tab.

Still having problems? Open a support ticket with as many details as you can provide (usernames, email addresses you might have used) and we’ll be happy to help.

The Best Grocery List for Home Cooks

Still using a paper list at the grocery store? You’re missing out. Go right from recipes to automatically-sorted time-saving lists. Text your list to someone else, or even share your list within your household. Watch this brief demo to see some of the things you can do with BigOven’s easy-to-use grocery list:

Meal Planner will Require BigOven Pro Starting February 15, 2017

Hi cooks,

We’re making an important change to our membership plans. Starting February 15th 2017, BigOven’s Meal Planner will require BigOven Pro membership.

This change only impacts those of you who are free members who use the Meal Planner. Everything else that you enjoy as a free member remains free. That includes finding any recipe, using up ingredients with the Use up Leftovers feature, a grocery list that automatically groups items for you by aisle and syncs with your household.

We’ve found Meal Planner most-used by power users, and BigOven Pro is our power-user offering.  While we all love free apps and features, there are real costs to designing, delivering and operating BigOven. Each month, we spend tens of thousands of dollars on the servers and bandwidth alone, not counting the costs of the design and development team. If you find Meal Planner useful, please support it by joining BigOven Pro!

BigOven Pro removes all advertisement, unlocks features such as custom folders for organization, unlimited recipes, private notes, nutrition calculation and more. BigOven Pro is free to try for 30-days — if you cancel within the first 30 days, there’s no charge. A single BigOven Pro membership removes ads and unlocks Pro features anywhere you sign in, and all your data stays in sync.

We’re continuing to listen to you, our community, in making BigOven the best app for home cooks. Got a suggestion? Drop us a note.

Thanks!

Steve Murch

Founder & CEO, BigOven